Category Archives: Physical health

When [cyber] bullying turns ugly: the newest form of self-harm

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Girl sitting alone on stepsWith the increase use of smart phones, tablets and laptops, younger and younger people have greater access to the internet without parental supervision. They are using this technology to express themselves and their feelings in forums where others can witness and respond. Sometimes the responses are harmless and even encouraging, sometimes they are not. With the proliferation of technologies making online interactions more accessible and personal, there has been an unfortunate increase in the occurrences of negative cyberbullying, and now, “cyber self-bullying” incidents as well.

Cyber “self-bullying” was first publicized in 2013 after the suicide of …

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Food Revolution Day – more fun than you think

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Jamie Oliver with kidsWhat adults don’t know about good food is surprising. What kids don’t know about good food is reason enough to join Jamie Oliver’s food revolution! It’s the fun kind of revolution; a violence-free movement to put compulsory and practical food education on the school curriculum in all G20 countries.

Parents, let me tell you why it’s easy to get on board!

When your kids learn about good food:

  • They get interested in what’s going on in the kitchen
  • Food becomes fun
  • Fun means learning how to make things in the kitchen (“It’s a game, get the spatula!”)
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Palliative Care: Dispelling the Myth. (Part two)

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young women holding hands with elderly womanIn part 1 of this series we left off with a few true/false questions for you to think about. Some of the answers may surprise you, run contrary to what you might feel inclined to do or say, or even make you a bit uncomfortable, but will hopefully give you a better sense of what we’ve learned about what dying people really need.

True or False:

1. One should always be honest with a person who is dying… TRUE

Information is a right. This can be enormously challenging, as we instinctively want to ‘protect’ our loved ones and feel that censoring negative or difficult information is for the …

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3 donation mistakes that will cost you

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child making donationThis might seem like an odd title. After all, don’t ALL donations cost you? Here though we are talking about donations that cost you, well, a little more than you bargained for.

1. Clicking without recording the donation

This is simple but so easy to do! You’re reading about a cause on the web that touches you; the donate button is conveniently placed at your fingertips and you click away. That’s a wonderful initiative but what did it cost you if you failed to record it and claim it on your taxes?

In Canada, the charitable tax credit …

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Three common myths about impaired vision in the elderly

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an elderly womanGetting older is unavoidable. Aging brings on changes in our body and our eyes are not immune to change. According to recent findings by the World Health Organization (WHO), 285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide: 39 million are blind and 246 million have low vision. Remarkably, 80% of all visual impairment can be prevented or cured. Unfortunately myths around vision continue to thrive. Consider this: when you hear the term “vision impairment”, what comes to mind? Blindness? Do you have visions of guide dogs and people with white canes? There are many myths surrounding vision impairment, especially in the elderly, but three common ones continue to survive and thrive:

 

Myth 1: I can’t

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