Author Archives: Kelly McNaughton

SEXTORTION: The New Cyber Predator – PART 2

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SEXTORTION:  The New Cyber Predator - PART 2Last time, we discussed the phenomenon of sextortion and cyber-predation, dangerous crimes that have grown out of the age of social media and internet. How does one fall victim to these crimes, and how can we protect ourselves and our children?

How Cyber-Predators Find their Victims

Predators are individuals, generally part of a network, who monitor live internet web rooms. Once they identify someone they think is emotionally vulnerable, they begin to gather information about the teen; where they live, their peers, their family, and information about the school they attend. It begins through social media. The predator uses verbal coercion, starting with compliments and flattery once there is engagement with the victim. The predator may disguise himself as a …

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SEXTORTION: The New Cyber-Predator – PART 1

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SEXTORTION:  The New Cyber-Predator - PART 1When I was a teen, many moons ago, stealing a look at The Catcher in the Rye at the library was risqué. My girlfriend discovered her neighbour’s stash of Playboy magazines in the garbage and carefully relocated them beneath a large landscape rock in her yard for our later consumption and giggles. There was excitement in the taboo.

Exposure to and the disclosure of the forbidden fruits of soft porn and foul language were more closely guarded and difficult to access in another generation and time.  Goodness, even everyday realities were considered too brazen. Tampon commercials and lovemaking pitches to sell condoms were not even on the radar. Even TV couple Desi and Lucy had single beds, and television rules …

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Information overload – digesting tragedy in the digital age (PART TWO)

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In part one of this blog we discussed the concept of information overload and the stress that this non-stop diet of bad news can cause. What are the side effects of this kind of stress overload? How can we support ourselves and our families in the face of the never ending stream of information and media stimuli?

Long-term side effects

Various studies have examined the impact of media exposure on people following 9/11. In one such study, approximately 90% of the participants demonstrated symptoms of traumatic stress. In fact, the greater the exposure to media coverage, the greater the stress, and post-traumatic stress, exhibited by the participants. This is a normal response! Post-traumatic stress, or PTS, is the …

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Information overload – digesting tragedy in the digital age (PART ONE)

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By most accounts I don’t watch much television, however, I confess that I am a captive audience to the series “Lost”; a cryptic storyline essentially following the disappearance of a commercial airliner and its passengers in the South Pacific. A steady diet of fascinating plot and entertainment.  Fictional.  Ironic.

They say life imitates art, but the vanishing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 on March 8 is pure tragedy. And much like the events at Sandy Hook Elementary school before it, and 9/11 before that, we become the captive audience spellbound by widespread theorizing, speculation, and the maelstrom of news and media around these incidents.

Information overload

Gone is exclusive dependence on newspaper or television to satiate our curiosity and inform.   …

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You can stop yelling at your kids. Really!

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You can stop yelling at your kidsChildren do not come with a manual but if they did, the manual would likely include a bit about not yelling at them. As a parent this makes sense to me, but I have three kids, and the older two may be surprised that’s what I think. I didn’t quite master parenting in the first two rounds but surely by the time my 9-year- old reaches adolescence I should have parenting down to an art…

That art includes communicating with my kids without yelling. Many of us swore we wouldn’t turn out like our own parents, only to wake up one day and realize the apple really didn’t fall far from the tree. The truth is, much is learned from …

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